There it was, inside the program you were already using. Sure, it wasn’t pretty, but you could quickly add a visual highlight to your document or presentation. Even better: everything was rights-cleared, meaning you could use it in your document or PowerPoint presentation without the fear of legal repercussions Confused About Copyright Law? These Online Resources Can Help Confused About Copyright Law? These Online Resources Can Help It's a confusing subject, yes, but it's important that you wrap your head around it. If you're involved in any sort of creative work, these resources will help you do just that. Read More .


Microsoft’s gallery had an aesthetic, to be sure, and it wasn’t high art. But these images, cheesy as they are, were also incredibly useful in their time. It wasn’t easy to quickly find images in the dial-up age, and an entire industry of CD-ROMs you could buy for $50+ tried to fill that niche. You could buy those, or you could stick with what you already had: Microsoft’s clip art.
Back in the ‘90s, Clip Art took over Word and PowerPoint files thanks to the thousands of office workers and students who used the images as a way to “improve” their documents. These days there are a large number of free images available on the web, and Microsoft is recognizing this by killing off its Clip Art portal in recent versions Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook. “The Office.com Clip Art and image library has closed shop,” explains Microsoft’s Doug Thomas. “Usage of Office’s image library has been declining year-to-year as customers rely more on search engines.”
If you mean your own artwork, then you'd take a picture of it, upload it to your computer (make sure you know where you're saving it), then select Insert > Picture in Word, browse in the location where you saved the photo, click the picture, and insert. If you mean an image from the internet or something, you can just save it to your computer and basically follow the rest of the steps above.
While most references to Clip Art disappeared with Office 2013, users were able to insert the old-school images into documents using an Office.com Clip Art option. That is now being replaced by Bing Images, with Microsoft filtering images to ensure they’re based on the Creative Commons licensing system for personal or commercial use. Most of the new images are much more modern, instead of the illustrated remnants of the past. Clip Art might be facing the same Office-related demise as the great Clippy assistant, but let the images below remind you of the good old times before the modern-era takeover.
Back in the ‘90s, Clip Art took over Word and PowerPoint files thanks to the thousands of office workers and students who used the images as a way to “improve” their documents. These days there are a large number of free images available on the web, and Microsoft is recognizing this by killing off its Clip Art portal in recent versions Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook. “The Office.com Clip Art and image library has closed shop,” explains Microsoft’s Doug Thomas. “Usage of Office’s image library has been declining year-to-year as customers rely more on search engines.”

While most references to Clip Art disappeared with Office 2013, users were able to insert the old-school images into documents using an Office.com Clip Art option. That is now being replaced by Bing Images, with Microsoft filtering images to ensure they’re based on the Creative Commons licensing system for personal or commercial use. Most of the new images are much more modern, instead of the illustrated remnants of the past. Clip Art might be facing the same Office-related demise as the great Clippy assistant, but let the images below remind you of the good old times before the modern-era takeover.


If you mean your own artwork, then you'd take a picture of it, upload it to your computer (make sure you know where you're saving it), then select Insert > Picture in Word, browse in the location where you saved the photo, click the picture, and insert. If you mean an image from the internet or something, you can just save it to your computer and basically follow the rest of the steps above.
Be careful: most Creative Commons images require attribution, meaning you need to give credit to the artist in order to use the image. Make sure you understand Creative Commons and other licenses 3 Popular Image Licenses You Need To Be Familiar With Before Using Someone's Photos 3 Popular Image Licenses You Need To Be Familiar With Before Using Someone's Photos Read More before using such images.

Back in the ‘90s, Clip Art took over Word and PowerPoint files thanks to the thousands of office workers and students who used the images as a way to “improve” their documents. These days there are a large number of free images available on the web, and Microsoft is recognizing this by killing off its Clip Art portal in recent versions Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook. “The Office.com Clip Art and image library has closed shop,” explains Microsoft’s Doug Thomas. “Usage of Office’s image library has been declining year-to-year as customers rely more on search engines.”

I liked it for the simple inserting of visual effects for creating newsletters. Pictures do enhance communication and the ease of using a word document and gathering an image made this task easy. Now having to go outside of my document to find the extra spice my documents need makes this less fun. I have always used animated images that were less than artistic but were entertaining. Like others I will miss this service, but I understand progress is not always comfortable.
But this site's not just about Christmas. Need clip art for Easter? Valentine's Day? Halloween? No problem. How about something specific like angels? Teddy bears? They're here. In fact, we have clip art available for most major holidays and many specialty themes. So feel free to browse all the clip art and graphics we have, and explore the site thoroughly. Make this your "go to" resource for future holiday and clip art fun. Bookmark us now so you'll have a graphics resource all year long.
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