WPClipart: is here to maintain and grow an online collection of artwork for schoolkids and others that is free of copyright concerns as well as safe from inappropriate images. To ensure these qualities, no direct user-uploaded images are allowed. All artwork is collected/edited or created for use by me with the GIMP, Inkscape and some GIMP extras on Absolute Linux. Please email me if you have any questions or concerns. And thanks for stopping by :-)

I use clipart often and transport it into other programs such as Print Master to make cards. It was easy to make a few small changes in it and use what you redesigned. I hope you'll reconsider it's removal and put it back. Personally, I don't care for Bing's images. And I don't want to go out on the net to find other clipart when I'm in the process of getting a manuscript together. It's a waste of time.


Back in the ‘90s, Clip Art took over Word and PowerPoint files thanks to the thousands of office workers and students who used the images as a way to “improve” their documents. These days there are a large number of free images available on the web, and Microsoft is recognizing this by killing off its Clip Art portal in recent versions Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook. “The Office.com Clip Art and image library has closed shop,” explains Microsoft’s Doug Thomas. “Usage of Office’s image library has been declining year-to-year as customers rely more on search engines.”
It’s not hard to find images to use online – just use an image search. This works well, but it’s worth noting that doing so isn’t necessarily legal. Most of the images you can find this way are owned by their original creators. This likely doesn’t matter if you’re only using something for private use, or even a school assignment, but if you intend to publish a work you need to make sure all rights are cleared.

There has been talk about removing Microsoft Office completely, since OpenOffice and Google has free "equivalent" products. My school district has already removed Microsoft Office from classroom student computers. Only teacher computers and computer lab computers have Microsoft installed. The future of Microsoft Office looks bleak! Their motto must be, "One step forward, two steps back!" 

This is TERRIBLE! Besides being able to edit vector images like Will mentioned (which is important for those of us who don't have graphic artists available to create custom images or the budget or time to buy that service ad hoc), you could also search for style "families" (different graphics that were all in the same style). There was a huge range of files and styles in the collection and it was much faster to find what you need than to do a Bing search. Plus, you knew that everything there was free and free to use, without having to worry about CC license issues.
I use clipart often and transport it into other programs such as Print Master to make cards. It was easy to make a few small changes in it and use what you redesigned. I hope you'll reconsider it's removal and put it back. Personally, I don't care for Bing's images. And I don't want to go out on the net to find other clipart when I'm in the process of getting a manuscript together. It's a waste of time.
Which brings us to Creative Commons, the license Office’s new Bing-powered search filters for. My colleague Danny explained what Creative Commons is, and why you should use it What Is Creative Commons, And Should You Use It? What Is Creative Commons, And Should You Use It? Creative Commons is a set of licenses which automatically give you permission to do various things, such as reuse and distribute the content. Let's find out more about it and how to use it. Read More , but the quick version is that it’s a way for artists to tell the web their images are free to use.
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