Back in the ‘90s, Clip Art took over Word and PowerPoint files thanks to the thousands of office workers and students who used the images as a way to “improve” their documents. These days there are a large number of free images available on the web, and Microsoft is recognizing this by killing off its Clip Art portal in recent versions Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook. “The Office.com Clip Art and image library has closed shop,” explains Microsoft’s Doug Thomas. “Usage of Office’s image library has been declining year-to-year as customers rely more on search engines.”
The download marketplace offers a variety of products and resources that you can download to create better documents and presentations. This download section contains add-ons for Microsoft Office like this Attachmetric that helps to tracks who has opened your emails and attachments or ClearContext Professional to prioritize, organize, color-code, manage Outlook in a better way.
I liked it for the simple inserting of visual effects for creating newsletters. Pictures do enhance communication and the ease of using a word document and gathering an image made this task easy. Now having to go outside of my document to find the extra spice my documents need makes this less fun. I have always used animated images that were less than artistic but were entertaining. Like others I will miss this service, but I understand progress is not always comfortable.

Bing Image Search uses a copyright filter based on the Creative Commons licensing system.  The results that are returned are images that have been tagged with Creative Commons licenses.  A link to the source of the image is provided, which you should use to review the source of the image and the applicable license to determine whether your use will comply with the license. (The settings can be switched to show all web results to view more images.)  However, you are responsible for respecting others’ rights, including copyright. Learn more here.
While most references to Clip Art disappeared with Office 2013, users were able to insert the old-school images into documents using an Office.com Clip Art option. That is now being replaced by Bing Images, with Microsoft filtering images to ensure they’re based on the Creative Commons licensing system for personal or commercial use. Most of the new images are much more modern, instead of the illustrated remnants of the past. Clip Art might be facing the same Office-related demise as the great Clippy assistant, but let the images below remind you of the good old times before the modern-era takeover.
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